Opinion

Why do we love to watch people who can’t act?

A year marked by new visualizations, both controversial and celebrated, of the black body

Openings at the new ICA, The Bass and PAMM played out against a backdrop of geographic uncanniness and atmospheric uncertainty

Nicholas Mangan, Ancient Lights (detail), 2015, two-screen installation, solar panels, batteries, projectors powered by solar energy, dimensions variable. Courtesy: the artist, Sutton Gallery, Melbourne, Hopkinson Mossman, Auckland and Labor, Mexico

At once stagnant and dynamic, politically tense and blissfully buoyant, the French capital was a strange place to be living this year

From victims of Hurricane Harvey to the music of Roger Waters, 2017 has been full of renewed debate around support for boycotts

From the drone blasts of Polwechsel to Pauline Oliveros's ecological politics, deep listening at the festival’s anniversary edition

From the exhibitions attempting to formulate ‘an acerbic language that speaks to our present epoch’, curator Samuel Leuenberger's highlights

‘Conflicts of interest’ may have cost Beatrix Ruf her Stedelijk job but the problem doesn’t just lie with individuals – it’s structural too

Canada’s newest art museum attempts to reconcile local and international interests

Margaret Lee thanks those who have helped her gain a deeper understanding of how to be more empathetic in difficult times

France's President Emmanuel Macron meets Burkina Faso's President Roch Marc Christian Kabore at the Presidential Palace in Burkina Faso on November 28, 2017. Courtesy: LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty Images

The French President’s recent comments hint at a dubious politics: using art restitution as a stopgap to France’s postcolonial responsibilities

Tiffany and Co., Sterling Silver Paper Cup, 2017, from the ‘Everyday Objects’ collection. Courtesy: Tiffany and Co., New York

Tiffany & Co.’s new range of gift objects and the shifting meaning of the ‘everyday’