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Collections

Art from the Portuguese world in the Age of Exploration

AR-PAB, Alvaro Roquette & Pedro Aguiar-Branco, Lisbon

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AR-PAB, Alvaro Roquette & Pedro Aguiar-Branco, Frieze Masters 2018. Photo by Mark Blower. Courtesy of Frieze/Mark Blower.

AR-PAB, Alvaro Roquette & Pedro Aguiar-Branco, Frieze Masters 2018. Photo by Mark Blower. Courtesy of Frieze/Mark Blower.

The Portuguese Colonial Art that will be displayed in Collections includes:

  • Afro-Portuguese objects from the late 15th to the early 16th century made in present-day Benin and Sierra Leona (ex: Afro-Portuguese powder-flask); Indo-Portuguese objects from the 16th to the 18th century produced in Portuguese-ruled India, such as ivory and wood carvings, furniture (cabinets, writing boxes and caskets) precious metalwork, namely filigree, and other precious objects such as Gujarati mother- of-pearl objects;
  • Objects made in Portuguese-ruled Ceylon (present-day Sri Lanka) from the 16th and 17th centuries, such as everyday objects and religious implements, namely ivory carvings (devotional statuettes) and also caskets or writing boxes made from precious materials such as ivory, tortoiseshell and silver;
  • Objects made in Japan from late 16th to early 17th centuries in the so-called Namban style, which are characteristic of the encounter of cultures, the outcome of the arrival of the Europeans to the Japanese islands, such as lacquerware (inrōs, cabinets, chests and writing boxes), and objects made from iron (tsubas);
  • Objects produced in China from the 16th to the 18th century, such as a porcelain, statuettes, cabinets, boxes and caskets designed for export to the European markets, namely to Portugal and Spain;
  • Objects made in Brazil from the 18th to the 19th century, namely jewellery using Brazilian gems.