Advertisement

Briefing

Gustav Metzger has died aged 90; director of the Met resigns

  • Gustav Metzger has died, aged 90. Born in Nuremburg to Polish-Jewish parents in 1926, the artist arrived in England in 1939 with his brother on the Kindertransport. He lived in London for the remainder of his life. He studied art in Cambridge, London, Antwerp and Oxford, and by the late 1950s was heavily involved in anti-capitalist and anti-consumerist movements, as well as the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. This political activism was the motivation for his auto-destructive art manifesto of 1959. Together with John Sharkey he initiated the now legendary Destruction in Art Symposium in 1966. A retrospective of his work was held at the Serpentine Gallery, London, in 2009 and his work Liquid Crystal Environment (1965/2005), is currently on display at Tate Modern, London.
     
  • The director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Thomas Campbell, has resigned. Campbell, who joined the Met in 1996 as a tapestry curator and who has been director since January 2009, has faced increased scrutiny in recent months as the Met has worked to tackle its budget deficit. Campbell has overseen a rough time at the Met with the museum announcing a 24-month financial restructuring plan in April last year, shedding around 90 employees through a combination of buyouts and lay-offs. He also introduced the controversial ‘recommended’ (now ‘suggested’) admission donation of USD$25.
     
  • Manifesta has appointed four ‘creative mediators’ for its 12th edition which will be held in Palermo, Sicily in 2018. Ippolito Pestellini Laparelli, a partner at the Rotterdam-based Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), Swiss curator Mirjam Varadinis, Spanish architect Andrés Jaque, and Dutch filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak will serve in the role. The team will work with local communities to ‘reveal the city’s perspective on migration, climate change, heritage, and the current state of Europe.’ They will publicly share their research in the spring and present their plans for Manifesta in the summer.
     
  • Two auction house records were set in London this week with Sotheby’s taking GBP£195m in its Impressionist, Modern and Surrealist auction on Wednesday, more than doubling its figure for last year. The sale followed a strong night at Christie’s, which on Tuesday took sales of GBP£137m, a 43 per cent rise on last year. The star of the Christie’s sale was René Magritte’s La Corde Sensible (1960) which went for £14.4m including fees, an auction record for a work by the Belgian surrealist artist. Gustav Klimt’s Bauerngarten (Flower Garden, 1907) went for  close to GBP£48million at Sotherby’s.
     
  • The Baltic, an art institution in Gateshead in the north of England, has announced Jose Dávila, Eric N. Mack, Toni Schmale and Shen Xin as the winners of its inaugural artist prize. The winners receive a show at the museum this summer, GBP£25,000 to create new work, and a GBP£5,000 artist fee. The international award is the first worldwide art prize to be judged solely by artists, the judging panel comprising  Monica Bonvicini, Mike Nelson, Pedro Cabrita Reis, and Lorna Simpson.
     
  • Chus Martínez has been appointed curator of KölnSkulptur #9. The head of the Institute of Art of the FHNW Academy of Arts and Design in Basel, will curate the ninth edition of the biennial which opens 15 October, coinciding with the Sculpture Park Cologne’s 20th anniversary.
     
  • The Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston has a USD$10-million plan for a new satellite addition in East Boston. The new Watershed building would increase ICA's exhibition space by 50 percent. 
Advertisement

Most Read

Why does the ‘men’s rights’ guru to the alt-right surround himself with Soviet-era memorabilia, which he doesn’t even...
Alongside a centuries-old collection of Old Masters, Delftware and Chinoiserie, the Devonshires continue to commission...
In a Victorian-era baths in Glasgow, the artist stages her largest performance project to date, featuring a 24-woman...
In further news: UK class gap impacting young people’s engagement with the arts; Uffizi goes digital; British Museum...
Italian politicians want to censor the artist’s poster for a sailing event, which reads ‘We’re all in the same boat’
A newly-published collection of the artist’s journals allows silenced voices to speak
The arrest of the photojournalist for ‘provocative comments’ over Dhaka protests makes clear that personal liberty...
The auction house insists that there is a broad scholarly consensus that the record-breaking artwork be attributed to...
‘We need more advocates across gender lines and emphatic leaders in museums and galleries to create inclusive,...
In further news: artists rally behind detained photographer Shahidul Alam; crisis talks at London museums following...
Criticism of the show at the Hungarian National Gallery in Budapest comes alongside a nationalist reshaping of the...
A retrospective at Munich’s Museum Brandhorst charts the artist’s career from the 1980s to the present, from ‘fem-trash...
At the National Theatre of Wales, a performance alive with wild, tactile descriptions compels comparison between the...
There are perils in deploying bigotry to score political points, but meanings also shift from West to East
‘It’s ridiculous. It’s Picasso’: social media platform to review nudity policy after blocking Montreal Museum of Fine...
The first public exhibition of a 15th-century altar-hanging prompts the question: who made it?
Poland’s feminist ‘Bison Ladies’ storm the Japanese artist’s Warsaw exhibition in solidarity with longtime model Kaori’...
An art historian and leading Leonardo expert has cast doubt on the painting’s attribution
How will the Black Panther writer, known for his landmark critical assessments of race, take on the quintessential...
The dissident artist has posted a series of videos on Instagram documenting diggers demolishing his studio in the...
In further news: artists for Planned Parenthood; US court rules on Nazi-looted Cranachs; Munich’s Haus der Kunst...
A mother’s death, a father’s disinterest: Jean Frémon’s semi-factual biography of the artist captures a life beyond...
Jostling with its loud festival neighbours, the UK’s best attended annual visual art festival conducts a polyphonic...
It’s not clear who destroyed the project – part of the Liverpool Biennial – which names those who have died trying to...
Dating from 1949 to the early 1960s, the works which grace the stately home feel comfortable in the ostentatious pomp...
Nods to the game in World Cup celebrations show how dance has gone viral – but unwittingly instrumentalized for...

On View

Latest Magazines

frieze magazine

April 2018

frieze magazine

May 2018

frieze magazine

June - August 2018